Health

Lep

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Last Updated on Thursday, 21 November 2019 19:35

Sprains, fractures and pulled muscles are among the most common injuries suffered by people. Unfortunately, in some instances, these injuries can take very long to heal, and in some cases, the patient never makes a complete recovery. Rather, they are left with a pain or weakness that continues to plague them.

In this regard, one very effective remedy is that of “Lep”. Lep is an urdu word that refers to “plaster” (i.e. the substance that is plastered onto walls). In this case, Lep refers to a medicinal paste which is “plastered” onto the site of the injury to assist in healing.

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Vegetables and Herbs and their Temperaments​

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Last Updated on Saturday, 31 August 2019 15:53

Previously, various fruits and their temperaments were discussed. Below, a list of various vegetables and herbs and their temperaments will be presented. The list will commence with vegetables and herbs available in winter, then summer, and then those found in most of the year or throughout the year.

Artichoke (globe variety): Hot and moist (third quarter of the year)

Broad beans: Dryness with some heat (second and third quarter of the year)

Brussels sprout: Cold and moist to cold and dry (second and third quarter of the year)

Asparagus: Hot and moist (last half of the year)

Olive: Hot and moist (first quarter of the year)

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Fruit and Their Temperaments​

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Last Updated on Monday, 22 April 2019 09:59

As mentioned previously, different foods, such as fruit, vegetables, meats, etc, have different temperaments. Accordingly, they have varying degrees of heat, cold, dryness and moisture.

Below is a list of various fruit, the period of the year in which they are generally found, and their temperaments. We will first mention the winter fruit, and then the summer fruit, and then the fruit that are not restricted to any period of the year.

Fruit of the Second/Third Quarter

Orange (sour): cold and dry

Orange (sweet): cold and moist

Naartjie: cold and dry

Grape fruit: cold and dry

Guava (unripe): cold and dry

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A Method of Determining Temperament​

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Last Updated on Tuesday, 05 March 2019 08:43

A simple method through which one may determine the temperament of a food is through the taste of the food. There are four basic tastes and each has its own temperament. They are:

Salty: These foods are generally hot and dry.

Sweet: These foods have some heat but are predominantly moist.

Sour: These foods are cold and dry.

Pungent (spicy): These foods are generally hot and dry.

Another simple method that we can use is the following:

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The Temperament of Foods

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Last Updated on Saturday, 10 November 2018 15:23

As discussed previously, temperament in Tibb consists of four qualities viz. heat, cold, moisture and dryness. These four qualities are found in foods as well, and hence foods also have their own temperament.

This means that foods will either be cooling or heating for the body, together with having an appropriate level of moisture or dryness. Accordingly, heating foods will increase the metabolism of the body, while cooling foods will slow the metabolism of the body. This has also been proven scientifically. Research by Dr Edward Howell has proven that when heating spices are consumed, the body dramatically increases the production of digestive enzymes.

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