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Brief Reminders

‘Weaning’ the Nafs

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Last Updated on Monday, 28 August 2017 10:13

‘Allaamah Booseeri (rahimahullah) mentions in his famous Qaseedah Burdah:

وَالنَّفْسُ كَالطِّفْلِ إِنْ تُهْمِلْهُ شَبَّ عَلٰى

حُبِّ الرَّضَاعِ وَإِنْ تَفْطِمْهُ يَنْفَطِمِ

The nafs is like a child; if you neglect (to wean) it, it will still have the love for the mother’s milk when it reaches adolescence. However, if you wean it, it will become weaned.

This couplet explains that a person’s nafs (carnal self) is like a young child. A suckling child, by nature, loves its mother’s milk. However, being a child, it does not understand that this milk is only beneficial for a short period, after which its consumption will prove harmful and detrimental to the child.

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A Modest Muslimah Inspires to Islam

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Last Updated on Thursday, 17 August 2017 15:50

The following is the first hand account of a female American doctor who accepted Islam due to a young Muslimah’s piety:

I am a gynaecologist and have been working in a hospital in America for the past eight years. Last year, a young, Muslim, Arab girl arrived in the hospital in the throes of labour. The labour pain was naturally severe and excruciating, yet I did not witness even a single tear fall from the eyes of this young girl.

Nevertheless, my shift was nearing its end, and so I informed the young girl that I would be going home and that another doctor (who was a male) would be arriving shortly to deliver her child. Whereas this young girl had not shed a single tear or emitted a single moan or complaint until now, on hearing that I was leaving, she suddenly began to cry and moan earnestly while insisting, “No! No! Not a man!”

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Tolerate Until…?

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Last Updated on Thursday, 27 July 2017 13:43

Remember the last time your child scribbled on the walls with a permanent marker? Did you reprimand and perhaps punish the child for this misdemeanor? If not at the first instance, then you probably did punish the child when he did it for the second or third time.

Remember the last time one of your friends spoke ill of you in your absence? When her crass comments and hurtful remarks reached your ears, did you choose to overlook and forgive? If you did, then what happened when she continued to behave in this manner? In all probability, you ‘wrote her off as a friend’ and decided to move on. Even if this friend thereafter came to you and begged your forgiveness, you may have forgiven her, but it’s unlikely that you will forget the manner in which she stabbed you in the back.

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Food for the Soul

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Last Updated on Saturday, 08 July 2017 15:18

Staring into the starlit sky,

sighting the crescent moon.

Ramadhaan has at last come by,

and not a moment too soon.

 

Depending on people’s state of heart,

this month has different meaning.

Some greedily fill the grocery cart,

while others see spiritual healing.

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Haleem and Naan … or a Revolutionary Ramadhaan?

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Last Updated on Saturday, 08 July 2017 15:12

People often speak about the ‘one special moment’ that changed everything in their lives. For some, it’s the moment when they were struck by a brainwave that led to a revolutionary invention which rocketed them to fame and fortune. For a professional sportsman, it’s often the moment when they signed onto the team or scored the crucial goal. I am neither a sports star nor a genius inventor. I am merely an ordinary Muslimah, like most of you out there, and my life did not change in a ‘single magical moment’. Instead, my entire life changed in a single Ramadhaan...

I remember the period with crystal clarity. I was 18 years old, the countdown for the dreaded final matric exams had commenced and Ramadhaan was around the corner. Although I put up a brave front, I would never admit it, but my world was in turmoil and I was, in general, miserable, confused, stressed out and even a little scared.

I was always considered intelligent and never had to work hard to produce good grades. As I progressed through the years in school, my above-average marks impressed both my teachers and family. While I was content to be the homely type and never entertained visions of varsity after school, they began to plot the course that my life would follow, taking it for granted that I would be complacent and would meekly ‘do as I was told’. I remember Aunty Khairoon declare, with her mehndi-dyed finger wagging under my nose, “You got brains, bachu (darling)! You a bright girl! Can’t waste that potential frying puri patha in the kitchen!”

Read more: Haleem and Naan … or a Revolutionary Ramadhaan?

   

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